Loading the content... Loading depends on your connection speed!

Shopping Cart - Rs. 0

Crab Theology: Women, Christianity and Conflict in the ‘Northeast’

Crab Theology: Women, Christianity and Conflict in the ‘Northeast’

Rs. 50


This essay addresses the role that religion plays in sociopolitical processes in Mizoram by attempting to gauge the impact that churches have had in mediating conflicts and brokering peace in the state since the 1960s. It also examines the role of women (and lack thereof) in peacebuilding processes and explores gendered critiques of the same.
As Sawmveli and Tellis write, churches in Mizoram are centralized bodies that hold immense power, thus enabling church leaders to aid Mizo ‘militants’ in negotiating with the Indian government as early as 1966, when insurgency first broke out. However, women did not have much of a decision-making role, neither within the clergy nor during negotiations. The lack of women’s participation can be explained, according to the authors, by the entrenched patriarchy and misogyny in Mizo society. In fact, interviews with Mizo women reveal that they acknowledge the crucial role the church played in mediation, but did not see their exclusion from the process as an issue.
The essay further states that since most political parties in the region are aligned with churches, patriarchy in politics overlaps with patriarchal church culture to marginalize women. However, they also discuss the many women’s organizations that have come up over the years to facilitate women’s entry into the public sphere. Women are also reclaiming traditional proverbs that were used to oppress and belittle them—the essay cites Lalrinawmi Ralte’s rewriting of a popular saying that devalues women as crab meat in the form of what she calls ‘Crab Theology’.


Additional Information

Additional Information

Year of Publication

2010

Page Count

13 pp

Format

PDF

ISBN N/A
Reviews (0)

Reviews

There are no reviews yet, would you like to submit yours?

Be the first to review “Crab Theology: Women, Christianity and Conflict in the ‘Northeast’”

*

Mobile version: Enabled